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Masonic History
The fraternity of Freemasonry, also known as "Free and Accepted Masons," is organized by private groups of members variously known as lodges, chapters, councils, commanderies, consistories, etc., which can be collectively referred to as "Masonic bodies".

The basic Masonic body is the "Masonic Lodge", which alone can make a Mason, and confers the first three degrees in Masonry, being that of Entered Apprentice, Fellowcraft, and Master Mason.

While there is no degree in Freemasonry higher than that of Master Mason, there are a number of related organizations which have as a prerequisite to joining that one be a Master Mason, such as the Scottish Rite and the York Rite.

Additionally, there are also organizations affiliated with Freemasonry that admit both Master Masons and non-Masons who have some relation to a Master Mason, such as the Order of the Eastern Star, International Order of Job`s Daughters and the Order of the Amaranth. Still other affiliated organizations like the Order of DeMolay and the International Order of the Rainbow for Girls admit non-Masons and have no requirement that an applicant be related to a Master Mason.

Fellowship Lodge 265 is proud that a number of our members have continued their Masonic education through active participation in one of several Masonic appendant and concordant bodies. Here we provide an overview of some of those organizations and links to websites which will provide detailed information. If you want additional information just give us a call or contact the local body in your area.


York  Rite

The term York Rite is a term most often used in the United States of America to refer to a collection of Masonic degrees that, in most other countries, are conferred separately. As such, it constitutes one of the two main branches of Masonic Appendant Bodies in United States Freemasonry, which a Master Mason may join to further his knowledge of Freemasonry. Its name is derived from the city of York, where, according to a Masonic legend, the first meetings of Masons in England took place, although only the lectures of the York Rite College make reference to that legend.

The other principal branch of Freemasonry in the United States is the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite.

The divisions within the York Rite and the requirements for membership differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but the essentials are the same. In all the workings, the one requirement is that all applicants be in possession of the degree of Master Mason (the third degree of Freemasonry).


Scottish  Rite

The Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry commonly known as simply the Scottish Rite, is one of several Rites of the worldwide fraternity known as Freemasonry. A Rite is a series of progressive degrees that are conferred by various Masonic organizations or bodies, each of which operates under the control of its own central authority. In the Scottish Rite the central authority is called a Supreme Council.

The thirty-three degrees of the Scottish Rite are conferred by several controlling bodies. The first of these is the Craft Lodge which confers the Entered Apprentice, Fellowcraft, and Master Mason degrees. Craft lodges operate under the authority of Grand Lodges, not the Scottish Rite.

The Scottish Rite is one of the appendant bodies of Freemasonry that a Master Mason may join for further exposure to the principles of Freemasonry. In England and some other countries, while the Scottish Rite is not accorded official recognition by the Grand Lodge, there is no prohibition against a Freemason electing to join it. In the United States, however, the Scottish Rite is officially recognized by Grand Lodges as an extension of the degrees of Freemasonry. The Scottish Rite builds upon the ethical teachings and philosophy offered in the craft lodge, or Blue Lodge, through presentation of the individual degrees.

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